CHARLES DEAKE JR. FAMILY

AHBA. WILLIAM WAITE DAKE
Son of Charles Deake (Dake) Jr. and Abigail Waite Sherman was born in Greenfield, Saratoga Co., N.Y. on 29 June, 1790. He married a Paulina (last name unknown, possibly Towner, she was born about 1802 and died Mar 23, 1856 at Mount Morris, Livingston, New York and buried at Pickett Line Cemetery). He died on 15 Apr., 1865.

William Wait Dake Family

AHBAA. Cyrus Towner Curtice Deake

From East Tenn. State University files, Feb. or March 1908 -

Cyrus Towner Curtice Deake - Dec. 5, 1824 - born at Providence, (near Daketown), Saratoga Co., NY. When he was a year old (1825-1826) his family moved to a farm near Mount Morris, Livingston Co., NY (FACT: William Deake son of William Gould Deake moved to western NY about 1830). He spent his boyhood days there, attending a country school. Afterwards he attended the old Bucks Academy at Nunda, NY. He graduated from this academy and taught school in that section of NY for several years.

In Jan. 1850 Mr. Deake accepted a position as tutor in a family living on a plantation near Savannah, GA. He stayed there for two years. When yellow fever broke out he started on his way back north going overland by way of Knoxville, TN. At Knoxville, while fleeing from yellow fever, he encountered an epidemic of cholera and was held up there in quarantine. Later he went on and got as far as Jonesboro, TN and while there became acquainted with some gentleman who called his attention to the fact that a principal was needed at Boone's Creek academy, two miles out of Jonesboro. He secured this place, which he held for several years. While teaching there he met Miss Josephine Simpson of Kingsport, TN, whom he married on July 16, 1855. No children was the result of the union, the only relative surviving being two nieces one in Michigan and one in Iowa, his wife and nephew JuliusW.C. Deake of Asheville. Mr. Deake left Jonesboro in 1856 on his wedding tour and went to Little Washington, Ray Co., TN, where he and Mrs. Deake taught school for a number of years, conducting an academy. From there he went to Villa Rica, GA where they taught school for a time; then to Atlanta where he and his wife opened a private boarding school for boys. This institution was conducted with a degree of success until the breaking out of the civil war.

From the book “Secret Yankees – The Union Circle in Confederate Atlanta” As the Civil War started, loyal Union supporters met in private to discuss issues and plan strategies on how to stay out of the Confederate Army. CTC Deake initially used a deferment of being a teacher to avoid service. He and other Unionists would meet in William Markham’s office. Many Unionists left their wives behind in Atlanta and attempted to get through the Confederate/Union lines to safety. Some trying to escape were killed by Confederate soldiers or guerrillas in the north George mountains, others succeeded.

A Unionist Thomas Crussell approached Cyrus Deake in the fall of 1862 and at first told him there was a potential to make money off the war effort. Once they had developed a trust in each other they confided in each other that what they really wanted was to find a way to escape serving in the Confederate Army. Crussell suggested that they raise a company of sappers and miners to support the Army but as civilian workers. Once they had twenty men who agreed to join their company they left for Savannah and Skidaway Island. Once there they offered a Conferdate Colonel their company as civilian laborers at forty dollars a month each, with Crussell and Deake serving as foremen. However, once in place they realized it was going to be much harder to escape from Savannah than they originally thought because the Union blockade fleet was farther off shore than they had earlier thought and all boats along the shore had been taken up by the Confederate authorities. Crussell and another friend tried to get through the rivers and down to the ocean but were fired upon and only were let go when they convinced the Confederate soldiers that they were really harvesting oysters. The men then returned to Atlanta discouraged and apprehensive about their safety and the safety of their families. He succeeded in keeping out of the Confederate Army until the late summer of 1863. Like many of the Unionists, Cyrus had been under constant pressure from citizens committees to enlist, but he made friends with Conscript Officers and bribed them to keep him out of the service. When this no longer worked, he took a job traveling through the rural areas of Georgia and Alabama, buying up gum shellac for use by the Confederate Ordnance Department. Finally when he saw there was no way left to evade conscription, he made his way through the guerrilla country in the the treacherous highland of north Georgia to the Union lines in east Tennessee, first taking his wife out and then after a brief return to Atlanta, returning to Tennessee himself. He did not return south until after the war was over.

During this stay in East Tennessee Mr. Deake read law, was admitted to the bar and began the practice of law at Jonesboro after the close of the war. He remained in Jonesboro until the spring of 1874; when he went to Bakersville (NC) and in company with Julius W.C. Deake went into the mica mining business under the firm name of Deake & Deake. In 1875 he bought the Bakersville Independent, something of a religious paper, and converted it into the Roan Mountain Republican, of which he was editor. In 1879 he sold his mining property and devoted his time to the newspaper exclusively until the summer of 1880 when he sold out and began the publication of the Asheville News. The publication of the Asheville News was kept up until 1884 when it was sold and Mr. Deake retired to a farm and began truck farming. In 1887 he started in the florist business which afterwards became the Idelewild Floral company, composed of C.T.C. Deake , Mrs. J. B. Deake (this is Josephine B. Deake, Cyrus's wife) and Julius W.C. Deake. This business was maintained for several years until the greenhouses were leased.

Bust of Cyrus Deake is on building in Asheville, NC.
Detail of Drhumor Building in Asheville, North Carolina - Supposedly, Mr. Deake was a local merchant who got to know the artist (Frederic Miles) who carved this frieze while passing by during construction

 

In 1900 US Census North Carolina
Cyrus was listed as born in Dec. 1824 (age 74), in New York (both of his parents were also born in New York). His wife Josephine was born Feb. 1839 (age 61) born in TN. Julius W.C. Deake was listed as his nephew born Dec. 1849 (age 50), in New York and both of his parents were born in New York).

Cyrus T. C. Deake born Dec. 5, 1824 in New York and died March 11, 1908 at Asheville, NC.   Cyrus' wife Josephine died in Nov. 19, 1910 in Twin Falls, Idaho. In 1910 Idaho Census, Julius was shown as a single farmer and Josephine as his aunt still living in same home.

Burial:
Riverside Cemetery, Asheville, Buncombe County
North Carolina, USA  Plot: Sec H Lot 8

AHBAB. William R. Deake
William R. DeakeWilliam was born about 1821 in Saratoga, New York to parents William Waite Deake (Dake) and Paulina Towner Deake.  He moved with his family to western New York in the 1820/30's.  In 1860, he was listed as living in Pike, Wyoming, New York.  Prior to the Civil War he married Amanda Malvina (maiden name unknown).  (In 1911 she was listed as living with her daughter in Independence, Allegany, New York.  She died some time after 1913 and is buried at the Whitesville Rural Cemetery).  On August 9, 1862, at the age of 41, he enlisted in the Army at Amity, Allegany, New York, in Jermiah Hatch's Company F, 130th Regiment of New York from Portageville, New York.  He transferred to the 1st Dragoons on August 19, 1862 (19th New York Cavalry) and fought in the Battle of Tods Tavern on June 11/12, 1864 at Trivilian Station.  He mustered out of the Army at Clouds Mills, Virginia on June 30, 1865. He moved his family after the war to Charleston, South Carolina.  They lived there between July 1865 and 1869, when he moved to Whitesville, Allegany, New York where he was the proprietor of Whitesville Woolen Mill and Manufacturing.  It appears that he moved back and forth between Whitesville and Independence, Allegany, New York until about 1900.    On August 17, 1871, he filed for a Military Pension as a invalid.   He died before April 1900 in Allegany County, New York (either Whitesville or Independence) and is buried at the Whitesville Rural Cemetery.

William R. Deake Family

AHBABA. Mary P. Deake
Mary was born on July 16, 1845 at Nunda, Livingston, New York.  On March 31, 1862, she married George L. Blackman (He was born on August 11, 1838 in New York and died in 1906).  In 1865, they lived in Raymond, Potter, Pennsylvania and in 1880 in Liberty, McKean, Pennsylvania.  They had children: Florence May and Fred S. Blackman.  In 1900 they lived in Independence, Allegany, New York.  In 1907, they lived in Ithaca, Tompkins, New York and then moved back to Independence, Allegany, New York in 1911.  Here mother resided with her at this time. 

AHBABB. Julius William C. Deake

Julius was born on Dec. 02, 1849 in New York. (may have been the Mount Morris, New York area.  His uncle attended school in Mount Morris.).   

In 1865 when Julius was a resident of a western New York village he was engaged to a Sarah Rice.  (She was born Nov. 10, 1850).   Late in that year, after his father got out of the Army from service in the Civil War, his parents removed to Charleston, South Carolina where he studied law.  (Interestingly, there is a J.C. Deake buried in Charleston but prior to the time his family moved there.  There may have been another branch of the family we are currently unaware of).   Due to a misplaced letter, Sarah and Julius lost contact with each other.  (She later married Joseph Newton, a prominent resident of Hornell, New York.)  In 1869 his parents moved back to Whitesville, Allegany, New York.  Julius may have continued his law studies, but in the spring of 1874, he went to Bakersville, North Carolina and in company with his uncle Cyrus T. C. Deake went into the mica mining business under the firm name of Deake & Deake.

In 1875 his uncle Cyrus bought the Bakersville Independent Newspaper, something of a religious paper, and converted it into the Roan Mountain Republican, of which he was editor and Julius was publisher. In 1879 they sold their mining property in Bakersville and devoted their time to the newspaper exclusively until the summer of 1880 when they sold out and began the publication of the Asheville News. The publication of the Asheville News was kept up until 1884 when it was sold and Cyrus Deake retired to a farm and began truck farming.

The Landmark Newspaper - Statesville, NC, 25 Sept. 1885
J.W.C. Deake was route agent for the Western North Carolina Railroad and removed from this position in September 1885. He resigned to start a truck farming business in Asheville, North Carolina with his Uncle Cyrus. 
In 1887 they started in the florist business which afterwards became the Idelewild Floral company, composed of C.T.C. Deake , Mrs. J. B. Deake (this is Josephine B. Deake, Cyrus's wife) and Julius W.C. Deake.  

Julius was listed in the 1900 Census of Buncombe County, North Carolina.  They continued this florial business until his uncle Cyrus died in 1908.  By 1910, Julius and his aunt Josephine B. Deake had moved to Twin Falls, Idaho, where he applied for an old age pension. His aunt Josephine died in Nov. 19, 1910 in Twin Falls.  On a trip back home to New York, to visit his sister and mother, he learned that Joseph Newton, husband of his previous love, Sarah had died and was a widow.  Julius and Sarah renewed their relationship and in August of 1911, he returned to Hornell, New York to marry her.  The following clips were from local newspapers of the time.

From Allegany Co., New York THE NEWS clipping 1911
Old Sweethearts are wedded
J.W.C. Deake, now of Twin Falls, Idaho, back at the old home town for a visit, meets a sweetheart of youthful days and is to be wedded at noon today. (marriage Aug. 12, 1911, listed in Escanaba Morning Press in Michigan).  They will be at home in the west.

Escanaba Morning Press, Aug. 12, 1911
Hornell, N.Y., Aug. 11 - As the climax of a romance begun in civil war times, Julius W.C. Deake a real estate operator of Twin Falls, ID arrived her today to marry his boyhood sweetheart. In 1865 when Deake was 17 and a resident of a western New York village he was engaged to a pretty Sarah Rice. Late in that year his parents removed to Charleston, South Carolina,  where he studied law. Correspondence between the couple lagged and after a year or two the girl married Joseph Newton, a prominent resident of Hornell. Fourteen years ago Newton died. After a search of several years Deake located Mrs. Newton, the old acquaintance was renewed and the marriage followed.

Hornell, NY, Aug. 11, 1911
Col. J.W.C. Deake, a son of Mrs. William Deake of this place, is to be joined in wedlock with Mr. Sarah Newton at 174 River Street, Hornell, today at noon. Rev. Brown to perform the ceremony. This will not doubt be a surprise to many who have known the genial bachelor since his youth. It was back in 1866 that Julius, a mere lad, met and fell in love with Sarah C. Rice at Raymond, PA, when visiting his sister, Mrs. G. L. Blackman. A short time afterwards Mr. Deake went to Asheville, NC and a lost letter for the time ended the love affair. The years drifted by and Miss Rice became the wife of George Newton of Hornell, but Julius remained a bachelor. From Asheville Mr. Deake moved to 'Twin Falls, Idaho. This spring he cam for a visit with his mother and friends. While at Raymond he learned the address of his former sweet heart in Hornell and called upon her. Mr. Newton had passed away and the old courtship was at once taken up where it was dropped long ago. The wedding today is a happy event and THE NEWS joins in extending best wishes and most hearty congratulations. After visiting a few days in Western New York, the happy bride and groom will journey across the continent, where Mr. Deake has extensive business interests and there they will be at home to their many friends.

In 1913, Julius and Melvina Deake (his mother) purchased burial plots in Rural Cemetery, Whitesville, New York (town of Independence).   His wife Sarah (Rice)(Newton) Deake died in Twin Falls, Idaho on July 11, 1933.  On August 2, 1939, Julius died in Twin Falls, Idaho and he and his wife Sarah are both buried there.  (Death Certificate 115013).



AHBB. SAMUEL (SOLOMAN) DAKE
Son of Charles Deake (Dake) Jr. and Abigail Waite Sherman was born on Sept. 14, 1792 in Greenfield, Saratoga Co., N.Y. In 1813 he was listed as School Commissioner for Greenfield. Salmon Child, Asahel Porter and Samuel Deake divided the town into sixteen school districts. He was married on Jan. 2, 1826 to Ann Eliza Bentley. He was listed in Durham, Greene Co., N.Y. in 1820. In 1837 he was listed as living in Cansan, Grafton Co., N.Y. He died on 14 Dec., 1892 probably in Saratoga Co., N.Y.

AHBC. POLLY WAITE SHERMAN DAKE
Daughter of Charles Deake (Dake) Jr. and Abigail Waite Sherman was born on 11 Mar 1794. She married a John Hanford. She died in Greenfield, Saratoga Co., N.Y. on 21 July, 1832 and is buried in the Daketown Cemetery. They had children named: Maria, Phebe and Fannie.

AHBD. BENJAMIN C. DAKE Benjamin C. Dake Home
Son of Charles Deake (Dake) Jr. and Abigail Waite Sherman was born in Greenfield, Saratoga Co., N.Y. on 20 Aug. 1796. He married Serepta Wood in Saratoga Co. on 8 Feb. 1826. (She died on Aug. 30, 1826) He was married a second time to Asenath Wood. (she died on Jan 1, 1840; both were daughters of Daniel and Mary Wood). Both wives are buried in Brigham Cemetery, Greenfield, N.Y. To this union was born Warren and Winslow Dake. He built the home shown on the right in Daketown, near Middle Grove, Saratoga Co., NY about 1840. This house has since been distroyed by fire. He later married on April 2, 1841 a third time to Mary Jane Carman who fostered the remainder of his children. (she died April 1, 1905) He died in Saratoga Co. on 19 Feb., 1872.

I REMEMBER by Cornella Smith Seabury, grand daughter of Benjamin C. Dake. Stories of Greenfield and Daketown life.  (Picture at right is Benjamin C. Dake Home)

Benjamin C. Dake Family

AHBDA. Warren Dake
Warren was born on March 2, 1837 to parents Benjamin C. Dake and Asenath Wood. he was educated in the Fort Edwards Institute. During the Civil War he ran a Flax Mill in Middle Grove and after the War ran a Saw Mill near the old Glass Factory. He belonged to the 29th Regiment, H company of the New York National Guard. He was elected Supervisor of Greenfield when he was only 28. He lived in Greenfield for the first 50 years of his life, moving to Saratoga Springs in 1887. He was one of the charter members of the I.O.O.F. Lodge in Middle Grove, NY. He held the office of Commissioner of the U.S. Deposit Fund for a period of time. He died in the Saratoga Cure and Infirmary, on April 13, 1912.

AHBDB. Winslow Jacob Dake
Winslow was born on 16 Mar. 1839 to parents Benjamin C. Dake and Asenath Wood. During his junior year of college at Troy University he enlisted in the Civil War on April 1861 at Saratoga Co., N.Y. He served as a Private in the U.S. Regular Calvary and was killed on August 10, 1861 in the battle of Wilson Creek, Mo. He was the first casualty of the war from the town of Greenfield. Quoted by Cornelia Smith, grand daughter of Benjamin C.: "Then only a month or two later (after he enlisted) the day when Uncle Warren, Winslow's own brother, opened the weekly Tribune and started to read aloud the list of killed at the battle of Wilson's Creek, Mo. Suddenly he stopped , then said "Winslow is killed." Winslow was buried where he fell, but each Memorial Day a flag in his memory is placed on Grandfather's lot in the Middle Grove Cemetery."


A Mr. M. B. Bulch wrote a letter about Winslow's death in Service to his Country. 


WINSLOW J. DAKE was a native of the Empire State where his relatives now reside. His father is a wealthy farmer of Saratoga Co. and gave his son the advantages of a liberal education indeed. He left the classical halls of the University for the camps of the battlefield.

In the month of April 1861 he enlisted in the regular service of the United States at Albany N.Y. Accompanied by the writer and others he proceeded from that place to Carlisle Barracks Penn. Here he remained several weeks, receiving instruction in the "school of the soldier" and preparing for the active duties of the profession he had chosen.

About the first of June we were ordered to the west: Dake with a few others being detailed to recruit the 1st reg. Dragoons (now 1st Cavalry). On reaching Fort Leavenworth this order was countermanded and after remaining at the Fort and Kansas City, Mo. a few days the detachment was ordered to join Gen. Lyon then commanding the Union army in Missouri. From this time until the 9th of Aug. nothing of importance occurred: but on that day the subject of this sketch, with many other brave and noble men, was destined to fall in defense of a government, which had given to millions the blessings of Liberty - the security of Peace.

Mr. Dake was a patriotic soldier: one who entered his country's service for his country's good and without being influenced by any desire for personal advancement or pecuniary regard. A gentleman of superior intellectual cultivation and comfortable condition in life, had he been influenced by selfish motives his county might have called in vain, or at best have received his services only in return for honor and office conferred. But such was not his character. He knew what freedom was worth and considered that life itself was not to great [aJ price to pay for its preservation. A careful search of history, and a close observer of human nature he asserted with confidence that the signs of the times indicated an approaching struggle between Freedom and Slavery which so far as this nation was concerned must decide the question "Which shall rule?"

Firmly believing this he did not hesitate to array himself on the side of Liberty and equality, and before the last echo of Sumpter's guns had ceased to ring through the land he was a sworn defender of the sacred cause.

On the battlefield of Wilson's Creek he fell at the early age of twenty-two: and on that memorable field with a hundred comrades resting around him "he sleeps his last sleep".

M.B. Bulch



AHBDC. Sarepta Dake:
Sarepta was born on Nov. 30, 1841 to parents Benjamin C. Dake and Mary Jane Carmen Dake. She was named after Benjamin Dake's first wife. She died as an infant on Aug. 23, 1842.

AHBDD. Sarepta A. Dake:
Sarepta was born on Dec. 6, 1842 to parents Benjamin C. Dake and Mary Jane Carmen Dake in Greenfield, Saratoga Co., NY. She was named after her older sister who died as an infant earlier in the year. In 1867 she married Charles Edward Smith. He was an architect who built homes in the Greenfield area. They raised an illegimate child of Byron Dake's named Clayton Dake.

Stories written by Sarepta A. Dake Smith and Cornella Smith Seabury were provided by Ruth Donogh, grand-daughter of Jennie Emmalissa Smith (Sarepta's daughter and Cornella Smith's sister).

They had children:

  1. Cornella Smith (b. Nov. 11, 1868 at Middle Grove, NY); (m. Irving Humphrey Seabury); (d. Nov. 15, 1958 at Gasport, NY)
  2. Charles Dake Smith (b. Aug. 18, 1870); (m. Dec. 25, 1909 to Attie Decker); (d. April 16, 1951 at Middle Grove)
  3. Jennie Emmalissa Smith (b. Aug. 31, 1872 at Middle Grove, NY);(m. Dec. 28, 1892 Moses Bently Rowell);(d. May 26 1962 Tarzana, CA)
  4. Francelia Gorton Smith (b. Dec. 28, 1876 at Greenfield, NY);(m. Sept. 10,1898 to Alvord Calvin DeVoe);(d. Aug. 22, 1954 at Bethesda, MD)
  5. Nellie Merrily Smith (b. Apr. 27, 1878);(m. Dec. 20, 1923 at Saratoga Springs, NY to Harry William Clute);(d. Sept. 20, 1950 at Middle Grove, NY)
  6. Earl Stanley Smith (b. Aug. 22, 1879);(m. Julia);(d. Nov. 12, 1950)

The attached stories about Life in Greenfield, NY were written by Sarepta Dake.

AHBDE. Charles Dake:
Charles was born on May 8, 1845 to parents Benjamin Charles Dake and Mary Jane (Carman) Dake. He married Temperance Burhans (born Feb. 1848 in NY and died in 1922). He lived in Galway, NY. Charles died in 1925.

Charles Dake Family


AHBDEA. Nellie B. Dake
Nellie was born on Dec. 1876 to parents Charles Dake and Temperance L. (Burhans) Dake - possibly in the Town of Galway, Saratoga Co., NY. She married Albert R. Beardsley. She died in 1933.

AHBDEB. Amiele Dake
Amiele was born on April 1879 to parents Charles Dake and Temperance L. (Burhans) Dake - possibly in the Town of Galway, Saratoga Co., NY.

AHBDEC. Infant Dake
An infant boy was born on Sept. 1883 to parents Charles Dake and Temperance L. (Burhans) Dake - possibly in the Town of Galway, Saratoga Co., NY. He died on Sept. 25, 1883.

AHBDED. Pearl Dake
Pearl was born in June 1886 to parents Charles Dake and Temperance L. (Burhans) Dake - possibly in the Town of Galway, Saratoga Co., NY.

AHBDF. Starks DeSivigna Dake
Starks was born on May 9, 1852 to parents Benjamin C. Dake and Mary Jane (Carman) Dake. He was named after the family's Methodist minister. Held the office of Justice of Peace in 1876 for Greenfield, N.Y. He married Melverna Benedict Lyman in 1875. (She was born on July 25, 1854 in Saratoga Co. and died on July 14, 1922 in Greenfield, N.Y. Her family was Baptist and she was named after their pastors wife. Her mother Mary Armstrong (Ostrom)(Lymon) at one time owned the current site of Vassar College. In 1868 her family moved from N.Y. to Austin, Minn. and then in 1869 to Osage, Ia. and then from there to Charles City, Ia.)

The following account was from his son's memory: "The spring Stark was two, he had the chicken pox, not very sick, was soon over them and playing outside in puddles of water. He caught cold, had a relapse and nearly died. That was in 1854 - the year he climbed the long ladder and the family moved into the new house. He was three, - how well he remembered that time, - the old gander got him down and gave him an awful beating with his wings. he might have been killed if Warren hadn't been there to chase the gander away, before he drawn blood with his nipping.

In his first picture, one sees a small boy sitting up straight and primly holding one hand straight across his chest. He explained it was there to cover up where a button was off his jacket. Starks' pet peeve was Methodist ministers. A horse-owning preacher who brought his family for a few days visit, never expected to take care of his own horse. At Esquire Dake's one of the boys, who had worked hard all day, had to do that for his pious soul, whose only suit of good clothes must be kept spotless and not smell horsey. When the family, finally left for home after the noonday meal, their wagon would be loaded with a free-will-offering of whatever the farm afforded at that time. Aunt Phebe said, "they'd take it all, even if the wagon broke down." But their donations were really a part of a ministers salary, he was payed very little in cash. Outstanding as an offender was the minister that came one afternoon. He had two sons about Starks age. Starks was in the back lot picking blackberries - dreaming of the pies they were to fill, when he heard someone call Starks: Starks: - looking up he saw the preacher and heard him say, "You are to take the horse I drove up, back to its owner in Rock City." Starks rode down but had to walk the four miles back -- cussing all the while, for he felt, there was no reason why one of the minister's sons couldn't have returned the horse, even if they were company, good-for-nothing-boys. But worst of all, was when he got back home and found they'd eaten all the berries for supper. One satisfaction, he got out of this visit, was the licking he was able to give each of the boys. Although his mother, dear pious souls, was a Methodist and his father a Baptist deacon, Starks was not given to piety. Sitting still through a long Sunday sermon, followed by Sunday School in the Baptist Church, was an over dose of church for him, and when got older he stayed away. In his Sunday School days, ther was a bit of strife among the scholars, as to who could recite the most verses from the Bible. Starks memorized whole chapters, that he could recite at a moments notice. He classed the Bible as a literary masterpiece. There was plenty to do on his fathers 300 acre farm and Starks ws brought up to work. But not to the xtent as to interfere with his schooling. he was smart in his books and finished district school at the age of seventeen. During the winter of 1869-70, he was a student at Fort Edward, N.Y. In 1870, he won a Cornell State scholarship and attended that University, pursuing an elective course. He studied Civil Engineering, but did not stay to graduate. It was his boast - he was the only student that could run all the way up the college hill without stopping. he waited on tables to pay for his meals. He taught in district school for five years. In 1872 while still teaching he took up land surveying." In 1876, he was a Justice of the Peace for the Town of Greenfield, NY. His death occured on Nov. 10, 1937 in Greenfield, NY and he is buried at the Middle Grove Cemetery, Middle Grove, NY.



Documents on the life of Starks and Millie Dake

STARKS DAKE FAMILY



AHBDFA. Benjamin Clemens Dake
Benjamin was born on April 26, 1876 to parents Starks DeSevigne Dake and Melvena Benedict (Lyman) Dake in Greenfield, Saratoga Co., NY. He never married and was an antique dealer by trade. He died in 1968.

AHBDFB. Mary Edith Dake
Mary was born on Sept. 26, 1877 to parents Starks DeSevigne Dake and Melvena Benedict (Lyman) Dake in Greenfield, Saratoga Co., NY. She married Herbert Ellsworth on Sept. 27, 1904 at Pages Corner, Saratoga Co., NY. She died in 1966.

AHBDFC. Lyman William Dake
Lyman was born on Sept. 01, 1879 to parents Starks DeSevigne Dake and Melvena Benedict (Lyman) Dake in Greenfield, Saratoga Co., NY. He married Grace (Abel) Haynes about 1919 or 1920.. (She was born on Sept. 17, 1890. Previously, married to Walter Haynes they had children named: Clinton Eugene, Hiram B., Daisy and Elma Haynes.. Walter Haynes died in 1918. She died in January of 1975 at Middle Grove, NY and is buried at North Milton Cemetery, Saratoga Co., NY). Lyman died in October 1963 in Middle Grove, NY and is buried at North Milton Cemetery, Saratoga Co., NY..

AHBDFD. Alice Irene Dake
Alice was born on Oct. 6, 1881 to parents Starks DeSevigne Dake and Melvena Benedict (Lyman) Dake in Greenfield, Saratoga Co., NY. She married Truman B. Kilmer on Jan. 16, 1900 in the Town of Greenfield, Saratoga Co., NY. She died in 1951.

AHBDFE. Linna Edith Dake
Linna was born on Sept. 27, 1883 to parents Starks DeSevigne Dake and Melvena Benedict (Lyman) Dake in Greenfield, Saratoga Co., NY. She never married and taught school as an occupation. She died on Aug. 11, 1941.

AHBDFF. Avard Starks Dake
Avard was born on July 29, 1885 to parents Starks DeSevigne Dake and Melvena Benedict (Lyman) Dake in Greenfield, Saratoga Co., NY. He married Eunice L. Jones on Jan. 12, 1916 in Middle Grove, Saratoga Co., NY. (She was born Oct. 10, 1884 and died Jan. 1983. She was a school teacher in the Greenfield New York District between 1911 and 1932). Avard died in Oct. 1985.

Avard Starks Dake Family

AHBDFFA. Beatrice Dake
Beatrice was born to parents Avarad Starks Dake and Eunice (Jones) Dake.

AHBDFFB. Robert Dake
Robert was born to parents Avarad Starks Dake and Eunice (Jones) Dake. In 1945, he was serving in the US Army as a Corporal in the Philipines.

 

AHBDFG. DeLacy Guy Dake
DeLacy was born on Apr. 22, 1887 to parents Starks DeSevigne Dake and Melvena Benedict (Lyman) Dake in Greenfield, Saratoga Co., NY. He married Bessie (Minnie) D. Strouse. He died in 1982.

DeLacy Guy Dake Family



AHBDFGA. Elizabeth Dake
Elizabeth was born to parents DeLacy Dake and Bessie D. (Strouse) Dake.

AHBDFGB. Minnie Dake
Minnie was born to parents DeLacy Dake and Bessie D. (Strouse) Dake.

AHBDFH. Viola Melvena Dake
Viola was born on Sept. 4, 1889 to parents Starks DeSevigne Dake and Melvena Benedict (Lyman) Dake in Greenfield, Saratoga Co., NY. She never married and taught school as an occupation in 1911-1912 in the 10th school district of Greenfield school district. She died in 1964.

AHBDFI. Percy Winslow Dake
Percy was born on March 7, 1891 to parents Starks Dake and Melverna B. Lyman at Daketown, Greenfield, Saratoga Co., N.Y. He attended Ballston Spa High School, class of 1911 and practiced surveying at Corinth. He was married twice; first to Blanche Earls in 1920 (She died in 1951) and second to Alice Hammond (Burke) in 1953. In 1910 he was the Federal Census Enumerator. He was also a Charter Member of the Saratoga Springs City Planning Board, Chairman of the building committee for the Saratoga Springs Public Library and a continuing member of the Board of Directors. In 1917, Percy and his brother Charles V. Dake formed a partnership by purchasing their father's family farm. Charles V. lived on the "homestead" and Percy built a two story concrete block nearby. This concrete blockhouse was moved in February 1975 to a point at the east of the homestead.

PERCY WINSLOW DAKE
CHARLES VAUGHN DAKE
CHARLES STARK DAKE
(1954)

PERCY W. DAKE HOME, DAKETOWN
HOME MOVED IN 1976
ORIGINAL BLOCKHOUSE
PICTURE INSIDE PLANT


They developed a superior herd of dairy cows producing 10,000 pounds of milk per cow per year. The depressed milk market of 1922 forced them to resort to making butter which they sold at the Callenius General Store, Middle Grove, and other stores in Saratoga Springs. They made Dake's Delicious Ice Cream, at the farm on Daketown Road, selling 4,000 gallons the first year.

In 1923 they expanded the ice cream business buying a farmer cooperative butter plant from Clarence Latham at Kings. They borrowed $10,000 for plant equipment and a steam compressor to freeze their ice cream. They purchased a Model T ice cream truck with a brillant red body. They produced 11,000 gallons the first year. Charles V. attended the farm and Percy gave his time to the production of "Dake's Delicious Ice Cream" being sold in Saratoga, Albany, Troy and Ballston Spa. Production reached 100,000 gallons in 1929.

October 29, 1929 Robert McMullen, the Greenfield "Hill Top" millionaire, paid Dake Brothers $100,000 for their ice cream plant. McMullen moved the business to a new $150,000 modern ice cream plant near Splinterville. The Dake brothers were retained to operate the business. Then McMullen erected a super cow barn to handle 100 head with all possible modern gadgets. Four huge silos were enclosed within a round structure. Charles V. had the silos filled with ensilage, but never a cow was to inhabit it.

In 1932 McMullen sold Dake Ice Cream Co. to General Ice Cream - Sealtest division. The Dake brothers were paid $30,000 each for a non-competitive agreement. McMullen gave Dakes a $40,000 note which he was unable to pay, but deeded the great barn to them.

During the depression days of the 1930's the Dake Brothers had no jobs, but nevertheless had an adequate income. Their restless fertile minds developed a new type of milk bottle making it easy to take off the cream. They tried the vichy water business and some other unsuccessful ventures. They wisely concluded: "If it ain't got milk in it - stay out of it". A 1935 State law required that all milk must be pasteurized. As a result Dake Brothers created the Saratoga Dairy, in the old Patsy Hayes barn on Franklin Street in Saratoga Springs, which did custom pasteurizing for all local milk dealers. It was also a market for milk producers in New England and as far away as Maryland. In 1937 Saratoga Dairy was sold to Floyd Ellsworth, a Dake nephew, and brother of Ralph Ellsworth. Then a year later it was sold back to Dakes.

In 1938 Dakes bought the old City Water Works, on Excelsior Avenue for the Saratoga Dairy. It had space for expansion. It went from 5,000 quarts daily to 100,000 quarts per day in 1974. (Bill Barton was the manager in 1974). Milk was shipped to this plant from most of New England and as far away as Maryland. It was truly a blessing for farmers in the Eastern United States, since, at times, it was one of the few markets for their milk. They purchased the Saratoga Ice Company which did not do too well until Charles S. and William P. Dake (sons of Charles V. Dake) revitalized the plant into a profit-making venture selling ice cubes through the some sixty-five ice cream shops.

In 1940 it was back to the Big Barn making butter and cheese. Skim milk was used for casein, and the whey was added to animal feed. This was a early attempt to utilize 100% of the milk. In 1938-1950 the Dake Brothers purchased the former Dake Ice Cream Plant from Sealtest converting it into one of the largest butter producing plants in the East, however it was terminated due to insufficient profit.

In 1945 the Dake Brothers bought the Stewart Ice Cream Co. which had been established in 1918 by Donald Stewart of Ballston Spa.. This coincided with the return of Charles S. Dake, after two years in the Infantry of the United States Army in Europe. The Sealtest non-competition agreement had terminated. There could not be a more appropriate time for young Charlie with a little financial assistance to get into the ice cream business.

The Stewart Ice Cream Stores were launced by Charles S. Dake aided by Charles V. Dake and Walter Hall, C.V. Dake's brother-in-law who had retailing expertise as a former chain store manager. He decided to start production and sell ice cream in the shop locaed on busy Route 50, in Ballston Spa. The first Stewart's Shop was born. Two more shops were soon opened in Saratoga Springs and South Glens Falls.

In 1946 Charles S. Dake returned to "Cornell University" for two years study of Economics, assisting week-ends and vacations with the expansion of the stores.

Stewarts bought the Glass Ice Cream Co. at Schuylerville but in 1950 all ice cream manufacturing was combined in the "Big Barn" with Paul S. Robinson as Plant Manager with complete responsibility for quality standard and production.

A short time prior, in 1948, "Make Your Own Sundae" was a sales technique suggested by Mrs. Phyllis Dake. It was highly advertised on TV and elsewhere proving to be very popular and profitable in increased sales at the ice cream shops.

The brothers moved from the Daketown area to live on Union Avenue and Lake Avenue, in Saratoga Springs. In later years Percy and his second wife Alice moved back to the homestead, Daketown. In 1945 Charles V. purchased the "Hill Mansion" once the residence of the millionaire entrepreneur Robert McMullen. It cost $7,500 at Tax Sale. $50,000 was used for new wiring, heating, swimming pool and other alterations. Charles V. and his wife made it their home for seven years. In 1952 the "Hill Mansion" was purchased by Charles S. and his wife Phyllis Dake.

In 1950, Saratoga Dairy and Stewart's Ice Cream were incorporated. The Ice Cream manufacturing operation was moved from Ballston Spa to the "Big Barn" in Greenfield. By 1955, there were over 50 Stewart's Ice Cream Shops in operation. In 1957, Stewart's challenged the Department of Agriculture to get permission to sell their own milk, from Saratoga Dairy, to their own shops. Whit this approval came a 25% drop in retail milk pricing in the Capital District, and within a few months, the company held 10% of the milk market.

In 1959 Charles S. Dake took over the operation of the Saratoga Dairy with the assistance of plant manager Bill Barton. At age 65 Percy W. Dake had expended a million dollars making the "Dairy" an ultra modern plant. In 1969 William P. Dake at age 25 became a "Cornell" graduate in engineering, joined Charles S. thus placing a new Dake Brothers in charge.

Charles V. Dake and his wife Olive retired to the warm and sunny climate of Saratoga, Florida. Percy W. with his wife Alice returned to the old "homestead" to reminisce and survey the scenes of his early childhood.

The Saratoga Dairy and Stewart Ice Cream Co. have been developed by the new Dake Brothers, Charles S. and William P., into one of the larger and more profitable dairy enterprises in the East. They operate sixty-five shops "Ice Cream and Sandwich" in all directions from the capital district. Gross sales exceed $20,000,000 in 1975 (over $70,000,000 in 1983). The magnitude of the Dake's enterprises far exceed all other manufacturing within the Town of Greenfield since it's formation in 1793.

After Charles S. death in 1978, William P. carried on with the management of the company as President. He was elected District Governor of Rotary International for the 1956-57 year in Albany area. In 1961 he invented the centrifugal homogenizer for milk products. He addressed by invitation, the University of Illinois where his subject was "The History of Milk" which was widely publicized. Percy W. Dake died on June 16, 1979. In 1984 Gary C. Dake , son of William P. joined the company.

In 1994 a new dairy was built. The $4 million, 35,000 square foot building will maintain high quality standards into the next century. Stewart's also purchased the Bonfare chain, which included approximately 40 shops and 8 franchises.

In 2000 Stewart's increased its contribution budget to charitable organizations in their local communities to $1,000,000. Stewart's donates 5% of profits annually.

In 2003 Gary Dake became President of Stewart's Shops; William Dake is Chairman of the Board.

In 2005 the company celebrated the 60th anniversary of the 1st Stewart's Shop, was named the producer of the 'Highest Quality' milk in New York State by Cornell University and their chocolate ice cream finished in 2nd place at the World Dairy Expo Championship in Wisconsin. We also opened our 318th Stewart's Shop!

In 2006 Stewart's budget for charitable donations was increased to $1.75 million, four brand new shops were opened (for a total of 322 shops) and the Stewart's Holiday Match Program allocated a record amount in March of over $900,000 to children's organizations.

In 2007, the Stewart's budget for charitable donations was increased again, this time to $2 million. The Holiday Match Program had another record year with nearly $1.17 million being raised for children's charities by Stewart's and their customers. More shops are planned to open this year, so keep an eye out for a Stewart's popping up near you!
Today, more than 80 years later, there are over 300 Stewart's Shops. The company continues to sell the same fine quality dairy products and ice cream that made them famous. In addition, Stewart's also carries a complete line of convenience groceries, food-to-go items, ATMs and gasoline (in most shops). Stewart's Shops continues to adapt based upon the needs of their customers' ever-changing lifestyles.

Percy had a hobby of studying local Indian history and expanded that to other parts of the country. He had an extensive collection of Indian reliacs from his own land as well as priceless artifacts from other parts of the country which led to the formation of a small museum. He traveled to Mexico and El Salvador to bring back archaeological specimens for his museum. He also found a formula of how to "grow fish fast" and he stocked Gasher Creek with 45,000 trout. In due time any frustrated fisherman could come to Daketown, and for a small fee, be certain of a good catch of trout. Percy died on June 16, 1979 at (Daketown) Greenfield, Saratoga Co., NY.

Percy Winslow Dake Family


AHBDFIA. Dorothy Dake
Dorothy was born in 1922 to parents Percy W. and Blanche Earls Dake. She married Walter R. Beris. (He was Executive V.P. of Consumer Power in Jackson, Mich.) They had children: Cherry D., Percilla D., Emily D.

AHBDFJ. Charles Vaughn Dake
Charles V. was born on April 8, 1894 to parents Starks Dake and Melverna B. Lyman at Daketown, Greenfield, Saratoga Co., N.Y. He married Olive Traver. (She was a school teacher in the Greenfield NY District between 1911 and 1932). He was one of the founders of Stewart Ice Cream Company. In 1917 he lived on his fathers homestead, when he and brother Percy purchased the family farm and build a two story concrete block building. This house was moved in February 1975 to a point at the east of the homestead. They developed a superior herd of dairy cows producing 10,000 pounds of milk per cow per year. The depressed milk market of 1922 forced them to resort to making butter which they sold at the Callenius General Store, Middle Grove and other stores in Saratoga Springs. They made ice cream selling 4,000 gallons the first year. In 1923 they expanded the ice cream busines buying a farmer cooperative butter plant form Clarence Latham at Kings. They borrowed $10,000 for plant equipment and a steam compressor to freeqe their ice cream. They purchased a Model T ice cream truck with a brilliant red body. They produced 11,000 gallons the first year. Charles attended the farm and Percy gave his time to the production of "DAKE'S DELICIOUS ICE CREAM" being sold in Saratoga, Alband, Troy and Ballston Spa. Production reached 100,000 gallons in 1929.

October 29, 1929, Robert McMullen, the Greenfield "Hill Top" millionaire paid Dake Brothers $100,000 for their ice cream plant. McMullen moved the business to a new $150,000 modern ice cream plant near Splinterville. The Dake brother were retained to operate the business. Then McMullen erected a super cow barn to handle 100 head with all possible modern gadgets. Four huge silos were enclosed within a round structure. Charles had the silos filled with ensilage, but never a cow was to inhabit it. In 1932 McMullen sold Dake Ice Cream Co. to General Ice Cream - Sealtest division. Dake brothers were paid $30,000 each for a non-competitive agreement. McMullen gave Dakes a $40,000 note which he was unable to pay but deeded the great barn to them. In 1930, Charles and Percy left the country side of Daketown to live on Union Avenue and Lake Avenue, respectively, in Saratoga Springs. In later years Percy and his second wife Alice moved back to the homestead at Daketown.

In 1945, Charles purchased the Hill Mansion once the residence of the millionaire entrepreneur Robert McMullen. It cost $7,500 at tax sale. $50,000 was used for new wiring, heating, swimming pool and other alterations. They made it their home for seven years. In 1952 the Hill Mansion was purchased by Charles S. Dake and his wife Phyllis where they reared their family of four children, residing there until 1972. During the Depression days of the 1930's the Dake brothers had no jobs but had an adequate income. Their restless mindsdeveloped a new type of milk bottle making it easy to take off the cream. They tried the vichy water business and some other unsuccessful ventures. They wisely concluded "If it ain't got milk in it - stay out of it". A 1935 state law required that all milk must be pasteurized. As a result Dake brothers created the Saratoga Dairy which did custom pasteurizing for all local milk dealers. It was also a market of milk producers in New England and as far away as Maryland. In 1937, Saratoga Dairy was sold to Floyd Ellsworth, a Dake nephew, and brother of Ralph Ellsworth. Then a year later it was sold back to the Dakes. In 1938, they bought the old City Water Works for the Saratoga Dairy. It had space for expansion. It went from 5,000 quarts daily to 100,000 quarts per day in 1974. They purchased the Saratoga Ice Cream company which did not do too well until Charles S. Dake and William P. Dake revitalized the plant into a profit making venture selling ice cubes through some sixty five ice cream shops. In 1940, it was back to the Big Barn making butter and cheese. 1950 the Dake brothers purchased the former Dake Ice Cream Plant back from Sealtest converting it into one of the largest butter producing plants in the east. However, it was terminated due to insufficient profit. In 1945, Dake brothers bought the Stewart Ice Cream Company which had been established in 1918. This coincided with the return of Charles S. Dake after two years in the infantry of the Army in Europe. The Sealtest non-competition agreement had terminated and they returned to the Ice Cream business.

Charles and his wife Olive retired to Sarasota, Florida. He died on May 25, 1977. (See article on Percy W. Dake for additional details on Charles life)

Charles Vaughn Dake Family


AHBDFJA. Jane Melvina Dake
Jane Dake HareJane was born to Charles Vaughn Dake and Olive Traver Dake on Sept. 22, 1922 at Saratoga Springs, Saratoga Co., N.Y. She married George A. Hare. They lived Ogdensburg, St. Lawrence Co., NY and later in Gouverneur, NY. She attended Skidmore College, Saratoga Springs and graduated from Amsterdam School of Commerce. She retired in 1991 as a machine short hand instructor in the court reporting program at Mater Dei College, Ogdensburg. Previously she worked as a machine shorthand secretary for the state Legislature and judiciary. She was the 992 recipent of the New York State Court Reporters Association Hall of Fame Award. In 1990, State Sen. John McHugh appointed Mrs. Hare and her husband to the Skilled Worker Emeritus program. She also held secretarial positions with the Air Force and General Electric Company. She was a member of the Grace Episcopal Church, Baldwinsville. She was a member and president of the Gouverneur Trinity Episcopal Women and of the Gouverneur Women's Republican club. She died on June 6, 2002 at Crouse Hospital, Syracuse, NY. She was buried at Pine Plains Cemetery, Clay, NY. They were the parents of: Sharman (Clark), Kyle (Colvin) and Neal H. Hare. and lived in Gouverneur, N.Y.

 


AHBDFJB. Charles Starks Dake
Charles was born to Charles Vaughn Dake and Olive Traver on Jan. 11, 1925 at Greenfield Center, Saratoga, New York.  He entered the Army on September 3, 1943 at Albany, New York as a private. He served in Europe during the invasion of France and was wounded. On Oct. 31, 1944, he was listed as Private in US Army recovering from wounds incurred in the invasion of Southern France. He married Phyllis Sylvia Edmunds in 1948. (She was born on Sept. 6, 1926 at Fort Fairfield, Maine and died May 30, 2012 in Saratoga Springs, Saratoga, New York)  He was a graduate of Cornell University, Uthaca and of the Advanced Management Program at Harvard Business School. He was one of the founders of Stewart Ice Cream Company after returning from the service in World War II.

He was a member of the board of directors and of the executive committee of the Saratoga Performing Arts Center. He was a long time supporter of public television in the Capital District and in 1972 was elected chairman of the board of trustees of the Mohawk-Hudson Council on Educational Television. The same year he was elected chairman of WMHT-TV's annual television auction. He was a member of the board of directors of the Saratoga Fair in 1976 and was co-chairman of the County Regional Affairs Committee of the Saratoga Chamber of Commerce in 1972. He was a trustee of Skidmore College in Saratoga, active in the United Fund and served as director of the Albany Symphony Orchestra. The Charlie Spring and Charlie Gate near the Hall of Springs at Saratoga Performing Arts Center honor Charles Dake, a founder of the Center and an influential Saratoga Springs businessman who also founded Stewart's Shops. The memorial was conceived and funded by the Dake family in 1984. Dake one of the founders of SPAC and an early advocate of including rock'n'roll concerts to increase revenues, died in September 1978 at the age of 53 after a long battle with cancer..


Stewart Company President Dies

GREENFIELD CENTER

— Charles S. Dake, founder president of Stewart Ice Cream Co. and an active supporter of many Capitaland cultural activities, died Sunday at his home in Greenfield Center following a long illness.

A native of Saratoga Springs, he attended Cornell University and was a graduate of the Advanced Management Program at Harvard Business School. He founded the ice cream firm shortly after his return from service in World War II.

He was a member of the board of directors and the executive committee of the Saratoga Performing Arts Center and was elected vice president of SPAC in 1974.

Dake was a long-time supporter of public televison in Capitaland and in 1972 was elected chairman of the board of trustees of the Mohawk- Hudson Council on Educational Television. In the same year, he also acted as chairman of WMHT-TV's annual television auction.

He was a member of'the board of directors for the Saratoga Fair in 1976 and was co-chairman of the County Regional Affairs Committee of the Saratoga Chamber of Commerce in 1972.

Named a trustee of Skidmore College In 1977, he was also active in the United Fund and served as a director of the Albany Symphony Orchestra.

Survivors include his wlfe, Phyllis Dake, Greenfield Center; three sons and a daughter.

Funeral arrangements, under the direction of the Bussing-Cuniff Funeral Home, Saratoga Springs, are to be announced.

Charles Starks Dake Family


AHBDFJBA. Charles Edmunds Dake
Charles "Chaz" was born to parents Charles Starks Dake and Phyllis Edmunds on April 19, 1949 in Saratoga Springs, Saratoga, N.Y. He lived in Greenfield Center, Saratoga, New York.  He graduated from Saratoga Springs High School in 1967 and  graduated from the University of Vermont in 1971. In 1972, he lived and worked in South Africa.  Charles was associated with the family business, Stewart's Ice Cream Company where he served as a director of the Ice Cream Division.  He operated a tree nursery business in California at one time.  In 1996 he was living in Charleston, South Carolina and he also lived in Winnsboro, Fairfield, South Carolina where he owned and operated a quarry outside of Winnsboro.  In 1989, he returned to Saratoga Springs, New York where he died on January 13, 1997.

AHBDFJBB. Heidi Helen Dake
Heidi was born to parent Charles Starks Dake and Phyllis Edmunds on July 12, 1950 in Saratoga Co., N.Y. She attended the University of Colorado and married Randy Keogh.  They had children: Tyler and Kelly.   They lived in Littleton, Colorado

AHBDFJBC. Bradford Grant Dake
Bradford was born to parent Charles Starks Dake and Phyllis Edmunds on Dec. 15, 1952 in Saratoga Co., N.Y. He attended the University of Colorado. In 1989 he lived in Saratoga Springs, Saratoga, New York.  In 1997, he lived in Arietta, Hamilton, New York and later in Caroga Lake, Fulton, New York.

AHBDFJBD. Perrin William Dake
Perrin Williams DakePerrin was born to parents Charles Starks Dake and Phyllis Edmunds on Oct. 31, 1955 in Saratoga Co., N.Y. After college he lived one year at Hilton Head Island, Beaufort, South Carolina.  He married Estelle (maiden name unknown).   He resided in Saratoga Springs, Saratoga, New York and in 1992 was living in Wellesley, Norfolk, Mass. and later moved to Boulder, Colorado.

 

 

 

Perrin William Dake Family

AHBDFJBDA. Graham Dake
Graham was born to parents Perrin William Dake and Estelle Dake.



AHBDFJC. Alice Mae Dake
Alice was born to parents Charles Vaughn Dake and Olive Traver on Nov. 12, 1927 at Greenfield, N.Y. She married Robert Deering. They were the parents of; Paul, Roberta and Carol. They lived in California.

AHBDFJD. William Percy Dake
William P. DakeWilliam Percy DakeWilliam was born to parents Charles Vaughn Dake and Olive Traver on April 3, 1935 at Greenfield, N.Y. He served in the US Navy enlisting on Aug. 28, 1956. He married Almeda Church. In 1978, he became president of Stewart's Ice Cream Company, originally started by his father and uncle. In 1978, he also was appointed to the Board of Directors of Manufacturers Hanover Trust - Capital Region. He graduated from Cornell University in 1969. He was active in Saratoga County civic affairs, being chairman for Saratoga County YMCA, board member Proctor's Theater and National Museum of Dance, and a member of the Saratoga County Planning Board. They had four children and lived in Saratoga Springs, NY. He later married Susan Law. Quoting from the Saratoga Springs newspaper "The family attitude motivates Dake in his role as president for Stewart's Shops since 1978. This company prides itself on giving back to the community through numerour donations and through the Dakes' shared ownership with their employees". His hobbies are flying his airplane, sailing his sailboat, playing tennis and golf.

William Percy Dake Family



AHBDFJDA. Laura Dake
Laura was born to parents William Percy Dake and Almeda (Church) Dake. She married a Mr. Roche.

AHBDFJDB. Gary C. Dake
Gary was born to parents William Percy Dake and Almeda Church. President of Stewart's Shops (2007).

 

 

 

Gary C. Dake Family

AHBDFJDBA. Zachary Dake
Zacary was born to Gary and Karen Dake.

AHBDFJDBB. Charles Dake
Charles was born to Gary and Karen Dake.


AHBDFJDC. Glen Dake
Glen was born to parents William Percy Dake and Almeda (Church) Dake. Glen went to Southern California in 1987 after graduating from Cornell University and founded a landscape architectural practice focusing on colleges, elementary schools and playgrounds. He helped build the Echo Park Community Garden, and helped organize the Los Angeles Community Garden Council, a county-wide coalition of community gardens. He serves on the Liberty Hill Foundation's Environmental Justice Funding Board.

 

 


AHBDFJDD. Renee Dake
Renee was born to parents William Percy Dake and Almeda (Church) Dake.

AHBDFJDE. Zoe Dake
Zoe was born to parents William Percy Dake and Susan (Law) Dake.


AHBDFK. Roscoe Edwin Everett Dake
Roscoe (Rocky) was born on April 10, 1896 at Ballston Spa, Saratoga Co., N.Y. to parents Starks and Melvina Lyman Dake. He attended public schools in the "Daketown" district of the town of Greenfield, Saratoga Co., N.Y. He was graduated from Ballston Spa High School in the class of 1913. Employed in research laboratory of General Electric Co. in 1913 and 14. He attended Middlebury College, Middlebury, Vermont from Sept. 1914 until Nov. 1917 when he entered the United States Army in Nov. 1917 and served in the Motor Transport Corp. in France from Jan. 1918 until July 1919. (Greenfield Glimpses indicates he was in the Medical Corps). He attended the Universite de Montpellier, at Heiault, France from March 1, 1919 to July 1, 1919 while on furlough. He returned to Middlebury College in Sept. 1919 as a laboratory assistant in chemistry, to complete graduation requirements, graduating with a BS degree in June 1920.

While in college, he played varsity football in 1916, 17 and 1919. He was a member of Kappa Delta Rho fraternity. He was elected to Sages, honorary sophomore society and Waubanakees, senior honorary society. He was business manager of his class yearbook.

In 1920 and 21, he taught chemistry and mathematics at Troy Conference Academy, (now Green Mountain College), Poultney, Vermont. He also coached football, basketball and baseball. From 1921 until 1937 he taught chemistry and math at Phillips Academy, Andover, Mass. Also coached intramural sports, later was assistant football and varsity swimming coach from 1937 until 1954. He was chairman of the chemistry department at Andover for more than 20 years, was head swimming coach for 30 years and assistant football coach for 15 years. He served as chairman of the Chemistry Department from 1937 until 1961 and was appointed in 1959 as the first Donner Foundation Fellow, (now Independence Foundation). Mr. Dake was the founder of the Interscholastic Swimming Coaches' Assn.

He did graduate study at summer sessions at M.I.T. in 1928 at Cornell University in 1936, at Columbia University in 1937 and 38 and at Union College in 1948.

On July 20th, 1926 he married to Ruth Cadmus. (She died on Aug. 3, 1947 - grandson James Cadmus Dake indicates he believes she was descended from Mayflower pilgrim leader William Bradford. The family living in Hingham, Mass. for many generations where a house still is standing and in use.) He married a second time to Mary Carpenter on June 23, 1950. He retired from Phillips Academy in 1961. He taught chemistry at the Groton School in 1962 and 63, the Taft School in 1964 and 65 and the Orme School in 1965 and 66. He again taught in the fall term of 1967 at the Groton School and Concord Academy. He lived in the summer at Andover, Mass. and in the winter at Green Valley, Arizona. He died Jan. 1981 in Green Valley, AZ.

Roscoe Everett Dake Family



AHBDFKA. Richard Edwin Dake
Richard (Dick) was born on June 1, 1928 to Roscoe Everett Dake and Ruth Cadmus in Boston, MA. He was raised in Andover, MA. He attended and graduated in 1951 from Amherst College. He married Ann Mitchell Wyeth on Dec. 15, 1956 in Beverly, MA. (She was born and raised in Beverly, MA. She was a teacher.). Dick was a Safety Engineer until retiring in Centerville, MA. He passed away on February 23, 2004 from a heart attack and resulting complications.

 

 

Richard Edwin Dake Family


AHBDFKAA. James Cadmus Dake
James (Jim) was born to parents Richard Edwin Dake and Ann Wyeth on Sept. 19, 1958 in Beverly, MA. He married Sylvia Monice Reeves of E. St. Louis, IL on Nov. 25, 1981. He currently lives in Andover, Connecticut.

James Cadmus Dake Family


AHBDFKAAA. Bradford Reeves Dake
Bradford was born to parents James Cadmus Dake and Sylvia Monice (Reeves) Dake on July 26, 1984 at Wichita, KS.

AHBDFKAAB. Andrew Mullins Dake
Andrew was born to parents James Cadmus Dake and Sylvia Monice (Reeves) Dake on July 20, 1990 at Minneapolis, MN. He died as an infant on Jan. 23, 1991.

AHBDFKAAC. Victoria Wyeth Dake
Victoria was born to parents James Cadmus Dake and Sylvia Monice (Reeves) Dake on April 16, 1992 at Minneapolis, MN.


AHBDFKAB. Elizabeth Mitchell Dake
Elizabeth was born to parents Richard Edwin Dake and Ann Wyeth on June 23, 1960 at Beverly, MA.

AHBDFKAC. Amy Foster Dake
Amy was born to parents Richard Edwin Dake and Ann Wyeth on April 28, 1966 at Ipswich, MA. She married Stephen Gardner Brand (born Feb. 15, 1961) on October 21, 1995. They have a son, David Foster born in June 21, 2000 at Falmouth, MA.

AHBDFKB. Barbara Bradford Dake
Barbara was born to parents Roscoe E. Dake and Ruth (Cadmus) Dake. She married Charles Clark Johnson. They had children: Peter Bradford, Andrea Carol and Virginia Lee Johnson.

AHBDG. Earl B. Dake:
Earl was born on Jan. 7, 1855 to parents Benjamin C. Dake and Abigail (Sherman) Dake.

AHBDH. Byron A. Dake:
Byron was born on Sept. 3, 1856 in Greenfield Co., NY to parents Benjamin C. Dake and Abigail (Sherman) Dake. He fathered an illegimate child named Clayton Dake who was brought up by Sarepta Dake and her husband Charles Smith. Clayton's mother was Minnie Davis (born 1864).

Byron A. Dake Family


AHBDHA. Clayton Dake
Clayton was born on August 1, 1886 to Byron A. Dake and Minnie Davis (born 1864) out of wedlock. He was raised by Sarepta Dake and her husband Charles Smith.

AHBDI. Mary Jane Dake:
Mary Jane was born on May 21, 1860 to parents Benjamin C. Dake and Abigail (Sherman) Dake in Greenfield, Saratoga Co., NY. She married George McConchie. They lived in Charlton, NY.

AHBE. SUSANNA DAKE
Daughter of Charles Deake (Dake) Jr. and Abigail Waite Sherman was born on 26 Dec. 1798. She married a William Child. She died on 17 Apr. 1865.

AHBF. OLIVE DAKE
Daughter of Charles Deake (Dake) Jr. and Abigail Waite Sherman was born on 4 May 1801 at Saratoga Co. (Daketown), NY. She married Israel Robords. They had a daughter Mary E. Robords (born in 1836 in Hudson Twp., Bates Co., MO. Mary married Ava Everett Erabzebub Page in 1861. She moved to Roswell, NM after the death of her husband and died in June 1919), son Charles Israel Robords (born Feb. 22, 1832 at Monroe, NY and died after 1883 at Bates, MO. He married Thalia A. Bryner about 1870 at Bates, MO. He was a Judge) and a daughter Cynthia Robords. Olive died after 1880 in Bates Co., MO.

From the History of Bates Co., MO: Rev. Israel Robords was of Scotch descent. A missionary Baptist in Hundson, Twp. in 1843. He was born in Galway, NY in 1799. He preached for many years and had Missionary Baptist Churches in New Haven, Conn. and New York City. He had a bronchial infection and traveled west to seek relief. He passed through Bates Co. Missouri and he liked it and returned for his family, and settled there in 1842. His only son Charles Israel Robords who was appointed Circuit Judge in Bates Co. in 1865. Israel resided in Bates Co. until his death in Indiana in 1851. He was an extensive traveler. Besides seeing much of America he also went to Europe. He was a contremporary and friend of Knapp, who achieved a national reputation as a revivalist.

AHBG. LYDIA DAKE
Daughter of Charles Deake (Dake) Jr. and Abigail Waite Sherman was born on 4 Nov. 1803. She married a Henry Gardiner. She died on 19 Jan. 1855.

AHBH. SALLY DAKE
Daughter of Charles Deake (Dake) Jr. and Abigail Waite Sherman was born on 22 Feb. 1806. She married Joel B. Gardiner. She died on 17 Mar. 1899 in Middle Grove, Saratoga Co., N.Y.

AHBI. WARREN ALVAH DAKE
Son of Charles Deake (Dake) Jr. and Abigail Waite Sherman was born on 4 Aug. 1808. He was drowned on his Graduation Day from Union College on 24 July 1833. His tombstone reads: "Erected to the memory of Warren Dake, who was drowned at Schenectady early in the morning of the 24th. of July, 1833, while bathing in the Mohawk River, the very day of the annuual Commencement of Union College, aged 25 years, 11 months, and 20 days, when he was to have spoken the Hebrew Oration, and to receive in course the degree of A. B. When his turn came in the order of the exercises, the President arose and remarked; "Warren Dake was to have spoken the Hebrew Oration, a youth of promising talents, a fine scholar, and being a high moral and religious character; but God has by solemn providence this morning called him to his last account." He is buried in the Daketown Cemetery.
Years later a Mr. Shotwell wrote up his account of Warren's drowning.

The top of Warren Dake's tombstone was found buried in Daketown Cemetery in 2008 by Catherine Finnegan and her husband from Middle Grove, NY.
A charcoal imprint of the inscription.
Base of the tombstone still in place.


AHBJ. PHEBE WAITE DAKE
Daughter of Charles Deake (Dake) Jr. and Abigail Waite Sherman was born on 7 Feb. 1811. She married a Daniel Turtollet Cleveland. She died some time before 1905 at Springfield, IL..

AHBK. CYNTHIA DAKE
Daughter of Charles Deake (Dake) Jr. and Abigail Waite Sherman was born on 17 Sept. 1813. She married a Edward Tozor. The date and place of her death is unknown.